A Comparative Study of Satellite Orbits as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO)

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Sandeep Vishwakarma
Aradhana S. Chauhan
Shoeba Aasma

Abstract

It is known facts that satellites are used to receive the signal at geostationary orbit by remaining stationary above a particular point on the Earth. The orbit that is chosen for a satellite depends upon its application. Those used for direct broadcast television use geostationary orbit. Many communication satellites similarly use geostationary orbit. Other satellite systems used for satellite phones use Low Earth orbiting systems. Similarly, satellite systems used for navigation like Nav-star or Global Positioning (GPS) system occupy a relatively Low Earth Orbit. There are also many other types of satellites : Weather satellites Research satellites and many others. Each will have its own type of orbit depending upon its application. The actual satellite orbit that is chosen will depend on factors including its function, and the area of serving. At some instances, the satellite orbit may be as low as 100 miles (160 km) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO), whereas others may be over 22 000 miles (36000 km) high as in the case of a Geostationary Orbit (GEO). The satellite may even has an elliptical rather than a circular orbit.

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How to Cite
1.
Vishwakarma S, Chauhan A, Aasma S. A Comparative Study of Satellite Orbits as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). sms [Internet]. 25Dec.2014 [cited 29Jan.2023];6(02):99-06. Available from: https://smsjournals.com/index.php/SAMRIDDHI/article/view/1133
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Research Articles